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Troubling Doubling??

 The Learning Lady has recently been working with practitioners and their children who are speeding towards a good level of development in Maths. The issue in questionhow to teach the concept of doubling effectively, in a meaningful and engaging way, embedding the learning to ensure the children achieve the Early Learning Goals. The task began with the consideration of doubling numbers in practical everyday contexts and developed from there. So, if you’re short on time and low on inspirational ways to absorb the children in this tricky area, look no further! Here are some of The Learning Lady’s ideas and top tips to end the trouble of doubles!!

Dice Up Your Life!

You will need

  • A 10 / 15  minute sand timer (depending on the concentration levels of each group)
  • 2 dice (with dots or numbers depending on the abilities of the children)
  • A whiteboard and pen to record scores
  • Some physical equipment to count with (just in case)

What to do

Before the game begins, create a scoreboard for all players on the whiteboard.

Play in groups of up to 5 or 6 children and begin as the timer is tipped. This keeps play on track and pacey.

The children take it in turns to roll the dice together. The aim is to roll a double (the same number on both dice).

If a double is not rolled, the dice are passed to the next player and so on until a double is rolled.

If a double is rolled, the child whose turn it is must work out a score by the adding the double dice together to come up with a total. This score is added to the scoreboard and play continues.

Carry on playing in this manner until the sand has run out on the timer. Total up all of the double scores achieved to gain an overall score and identify the winner.

Learning Lady Top Tip

Introduce calculators into the activity to add up the final totals of doubles- a great way of incorporating ICT simply!

Outdoor Domino Hunt

You will need

  • 6 buckets / old flowerpots labelled 2,4,6,8,10 and a pot / bin for non-doubles
  • Several packets of dominoes (ideally waterproof), the more the better!

What to do

Before the game begins, hide all of the dominoes in the outdoor area and display the numbered buckets and ‘bin’ in a central location. Order them from smallest to largest number, counting in 2’s all together.

Play in groups of up to 5 or 6 children. Explain that the aim of the game is to collect all of the dominoes and sort them into:

  • Non-doubles (in the bin)
  • Doubles with a score of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 (in the relevant contact us)

Set the children off hunting independently. The more dominoes to use the longer the game can go on for.

When the children think all of the dominoes have been found, return to the buckets and bin.

Check the dominoes all together. Are all of the dominoes in the bin non-doubles? Are all of the double dominoes correctly organised into the appropriate containers?

Learning Lady Top Tip

This is an idea activity to leave out for child initiated exploration following the original game.

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Playing Card Pairs

You will need

  • A regular pack of playing cards
  • A whiteboard and pen to record scores
  • Some physical equipment to count with (just in case)

What to do

Before the game begins,  remove all of the picture cards from the  pack. Place all remaining cards face down in front of the players and create a scoreboard for all players on the whiteboard.

Play in small groups of between 4 or 6 children. The children need to take it in turns to turn over 2 cards in a process similar to ‘snap’ or ‘pairs’. The aim is turn over a matching double (the same number on both cards). The children are looking for a match of number rather than suit.

If a double is not turned over, the cards are replaced and play moves to the next player (and so on) until a double is turned.

If a double is matched, the child whose turn it is must work out a score by the adding the double cards together to come up with a total. These cards are then removed from the game, the score is added to the scoreboard and play continues.

Carry on playing in this manner until all of the cards have been matched. Total up all of the double scores achieved to gain an overall score and identify the winner.

Learning Lady Top Tip

Encourage the children to take care when adding the doubles on playing cards. Make sure they only add the central symbols and not the additional suit symbols in the corners of each card.

Remove some suits for children who struggle to concentrate.

Paper Chain Doubles

You will need

  • Strips of paper in two different colours
  • Paper and glue
  • Number cards appropriate to the ability for each group.

What to do

Before the activity begins, make sure the children have had plenty  of opportunities to create paper chains in different contexts so that this is no longer a novelty.

Give each child a number card relevant to his/her own ability. Provide the children with time and space to create a chain to match this number using the corresponding strip colour to the card.

Once the original chains have been made, explained to the children that their next task is to double the links of the chain using the second colour of paper strips.

Create an instant hanging display with the doubled chains. Expect some children to add number sentences to the bottom of each chain to draw their attention to the doubling operation.

Learning Lady Top Tip

Use felt fabric and Velcro to make sets of versatile reusable strips. The opportunities to use these for pattern making, counting, number bonds and practical creative problem-solving are endless and well worth the investment!

Don’t Forget….

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Lego Towers

You will need

  • Lego in varying shapes, sizes and colours

What to do

Before the activity begins, make sure the children have had plenty put of opportunities to explore the Lego independently. Prepare some towers using single colours of Lego; the size of the towers will depend upon the abilities of the children in the group’s you’re working with.

Give each child a tower and explain that the aim of the activity is to double the size of the tower using the same number of Lego pieces of the same shape and size. However, the new pieces must be a different colour to those in the original tower. This will help the children to see the doubling of physical objects in a visual 3-D form..

Once one tower has been made, provide further Towers for the children to practice doubling with.

Expect some children To record their learning as a number sentence.

Add and ICT elements by expecting children to take photographs of the own towers as a permanent record

Make a class cityscape with all of the towers made. This would be even more attractive if a variety of construction types are used to complete the same process. Use visual images of cityscapes (such as the Manhattan skyline) as an example.

Learning Lady Top Tip

Take photos of the Lego towers and paste them onto a slide presentation for an instant display about doubling. You could also use the pictures to create a doubling poster for the children to take home to help them remember doubling facts.

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A Doubling Machine

You will need

  • Visit  http://theimaginationtree.com/tag/adding  and make an ‘addition machine’ as illustrated in the example. Do this with a group of children if you can
  • Ping-pong balls, buttons, marbles, or pom-poms to roll into the machine
  • A numbered or a dotted die (depending on the ability of the children)

What to do

This machine is best demonstrated first then used for child initiated exploration.

Show the children how to roll the die then add the corresponding number of balls/ pom-poms into the first tube, doubling by adding the same number into the second tube of the machine.

Encourage the children to add up their total ‘doubles’ score following each turn on the machine.

As the children become familiar with the process of doubling and how to use the doubling machine, encourage them to make predictions before the objects are rolled down the tubes, checking to confirm their answers by counting.

That’s got you started…..

Why not also follow The Learning Lady’s Pinterest maths board too

http://www.pinterest.com/Earlyyearsideas/maths/

 

 

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